In a Demon
12 Oct 2013 to 6 Nov 2013
Studio, 2013
Studio, 2013
In Between Mauve
In Between Mauve, 2013, 160cm x 120cm, acrylic on canvas
In Between Turquoise
In Between Turquoise, 2013, 160cm x 120cm, acrylic on canvas
In Between Blues
In Between Blues, 2013, 160cm x 120cm, acrylic on canvas
Giving and Taking
Giving and Taking, 2013, chair, rope, motorised winch
Giving and Taking
Giving and Taking, 2013, chair, rope, motorised winch
Giving and Taking, installation view
Giving and Taking, installation view
Giving and Taking, installation view
Giving and Taking, installation view
In Between Turquoise, installation view
In Between Turquoise, installation view
In Between Mauve, installation view
In Between Mauve, installation view
Giving and Taking, detail
Giving and Taking, detail
Giving and Taking, installation view
Giving and Taking, installation view
1 of 12

Preview Friday 11 October 6.30 - 8.30pm

Carter Presents 59, Old Bethnal Green Road, London E2 6QA

Open by appointment

 

In a Demon
For his second solo exhibition at Carter Presents Daniel Jackson shows the sculpture Giving and Taking and a new series of paintings (In Between) which expand upon previous works and open them up to chance actions. Acts which embrace, encounter and surprise through a mechanistic process with human intervention and psychological play.


The paintings are a panoply of viscera as the medium and physicality of pure paint override any systematized process and create their own inherent paradigm. Gesture is created by spraying paint with a syringe at different distances and velocities. Jackson's vernacular pertains to engage with and tease out from the ordinary a visual poetry with a keen eye for demotic rhythms. His deep, dark and haunting vision of the forest ingested, visualised and painted becomes itself demonic in presence and form.


Giving and Taking, 2013. A chair suspended by a rope moves slowly up and down, landing back gracefully on the floor in each cycle. The continuous interplay in the work of the chair as a functional object (a chair) and the chair as a sculpture, as it is continuously removed and restored by the motorised winch, create an almost surrealistic experience and question the very purpose in the specificity of objects and the meaning of sculpture.


I You Me, Blue, 2005-2013, has been exhibited in numerous iterations. For Carter Presents a large mirror becomes the foil for the projection back onto the ceiling. The algorithmically generated intonation of this computer generated text confronts the reflection of the viewer and their internal dialogue with their own image.


To A Point Somewhere, Blues, 2007 is from of an ongoing series of software generated drawings.


Daniel Jackson explores the synthesis of processes digital and mechanistic with human actions, engaging with ideas propositioned by Malevich, Mondrian, LeWitt and Halley of controlling the parameters of process and structure. In is art and in software that he has purposefully created Jackson is able to produce rigorously constructed works of art, across all visual platforms, whether sculpture, paintings or one off prints.


Selected exhibitions include: ‘Trajector 2013’, Hotel Bloom, Brussels; 'A Lot of Pianos...’, Marksons Pianos, London; ‘Daniel Jackson - In / Out’, Apt Draschan, Vienna; 'The Royal Road to the Unconscious’, Freud Museum; Look and Feel’, BüroFriedrich, Berlin; 'A Square of Ground', Jerwood; 'JUNGE SZENE 1998’, Secession, Vienna.


Notes on a process:
The starting point of these paintings was an extreme visual experience in parallax, looking through a dense forest of tall straight pine trees in north east Germany with light coming from above and through the shifting interstices whilst cycling along and seeing these thousands of tones moving against each other and against me.This moment became a self imposed and simple visual constraint to react to and with. The mark making is gestural, created at a remove from the canvas in an instant by spraying the paint with a syringe. There is little labour in the marks except the decisions which are a reaction to what has gone before and a motivation towards a notion of what the thing should be.These paintings take the self imposed rules in previous algorithmic works and open them to the chance actions of the physical medium: the interactions in the realisation of the process and the inevitable inherent structures that are created.
Daniel Jackson 2013